In 1911, Baden-Powell took the first steps in training adult leaders by organizing a series of lectures for Scouters. He made great strides in the years that followed, culminating in 1919 with the establishment of Wood Badge training.

Wood Badge recipients now number more than 100,000 and can be found in all corners of the world. The object of a Wood Badge course is to demonstrate the aims and methods of Scouting.

Six days in duration, the course is a multifaceted presentation of leadership skills, organizational tools, and participatory activities based on the best of Scouting traditions and the latest in team development theory. Participants will also enjoy the fellowship of learning alongside many other volunteers and professional Scouters, and along the way have a great deal of fun.

Upon successful completion of all course requirements, each participant receives a certificate and the Wood Badge — two wooden beads to be worn around the neck on a leather thong. Many Scouters consider Wood Badge to be a peak experience in their Scouting careers. It has served as a source of training and inspiration to thousands.

In return, Wood Badge participants have positively affected millions of America’s youth.